Fire Dept./ODM calls on public to monitor the progress of Tropical Depression #10

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Fire Chief and National Disaster Coordinator Clive Richardson

 

GREAT BAY, Sint Maarten (DCOMM) – Fire Chief/National Disaster Coordinator Clive Richardson is calling on the populace to closely monitor the progress of Tropical Depression #10 (TD#10) which formed on Tuesday morning.

The Meteorological Department of Sint Maarten (MDS) issued a Special Weather Bulletin on Tuesday morning, stating that TD#10 was over 1200 miles east southeast of the country.

MDS further states in its bulletin that TD#10 will approach the northern Leeward Islands either Thursday night or Friday, and that the system is forecast to become a hurricane by the time it approaches the northern Leeward Islands.

Once TD#10 reaches tropical storm/hurricane status within the next few days, it will be called Imelda.

MDS will be monitoring the system and will keep the public updated accordingly, and it also request the public to do the same.

The Emergency Operations Center (EOC) is prepared and stands ready to convene should the weather system’s forecasted track pose a direct threat to the country.

The Office of Disaster Management (ODM) reminds residents and business owners since we are in the midst of the hurricane season, to use the opportunity to revisit your business, household and family preparedness plans and be ready to take quick action when the need arises – be storm ready!

The community and new residents are urged to learn more about hurricane hazards and how to prepare for a storm/hurricane strike by visiting the Government website: www.sintmaartengov.org/hurricane where you will be able to download your “Hurricane Season Readiness Guide’ and “Hurricane Tracking Chart.”

During the season, weather authorities issue watches and warnings with respect to a tropical storm or hurricane.  Residents should be familiar with these terms.

A Tropical Storm Watch is issued when a tropical cyclone containing winds of 34 to 63 knots (kt) (39 to 73 miles per hour (mph) or higher and poses a possible threat, generally within 48 hours. These winds may be accompanied by storm surge, and/or coastal flooding.  The watch does not mean that tropical storm conditions will occur. It only means that these conditions are possible.

A Tropical Storm Warning is issued when sustained winds of 34 to 63 kt (39 to 73 mph) or higher associated with a tropical cyclone are expected in 36 hours or less. These winds may be accompanied by storm surge, and/or coastal flooding.

A Hurricane Watch is issued when a tropical cyclone containing winds of 64 kt (74 mph) or higher poses a possible threat, generally within 48 hours. These winds may be accompanied by storm surge, and/or coastal flooding.  The watch does not mean that hurricane conditions will occur. It only means that these conditions are possible.

A Hurricane Warning is issued when sustained winds of 64 kt (74 mph) or higher associated with a tropical cyclone are expected in 36 hours or less. These winds may be accompanied by storm surge, and/or coastal flooding. A hurricane warning can remain in effect when dangerously high water or a combination of dangerously high water and exceptionally high waves continue, even though winds may be less than hurricane force.

The remaining storm names for the 2019 Atlantic hurricane season are: Imelda, Jerry, Karen, Lorenzo, Melissa, Nestor, Olga, Pablo, Rebekah, Sebastien, Tanya, Van and Wendy.

Listen to the Government Radio station – 107.9FM – for official information and news before, during and after a hurricane.

For official weather-related information, check out the website of the Meteorological Department of St. Maarten (MDS): www.meteosxm.com

Remember, it only takes one hurricane to make it a bad season.  Are You Ready? Be prepared this hurricane season!  The Atlantic hurricane season officially ends on November 30.